He Was and Still Is

Jesus Teaching

God supplies all of our spiritual needs through His infinite resources. The Holy Spirit indwells us with His power; therefore, as we walk in the Spirit, we shall not fulfill the lust of the flesh. As we are occupied with Christ, we are kept from sin and thus “saved by His life” (Rom. 5:10).
“He is able also to save forever those who draw near to God through Him, since He always lives to make intercession for them” (Heb. 7:25).
This permanent priesthood of Jesus gives Him the capacity to carry His saving work to completion. He will assist us through every trial and difficulty right to the end of the road “because He always lives to intercede for them.” In saying this, the author reverted again to a truth he had already enunciated (4:14-16) where he had invited the readers to avail themselves boldly of the mercy and grace accessible to them through Jesus’ priesthood.
Therefore, the living Christ is in the presence of the Father interceding on our behalf and the Holy Spirit is in our hearts bringing us to repentance, confession of sin and reconciliation with God.
We are saved by His resurrection life as we walk in the Spirit. He saves completely, forever, all who put their faith in Him.
Because He is our High Priest forever, He can forgive forever. But let it be understood, at least in the viewpoint of this publications editor, one should not test The Lord. One should now say, “I know it’s wrong but I’ll sin anyway and God will just have to tolerate and forgive me.” Don’t do that because He may not forgive you! He may tell you that you were insincere and only being a “churchy person” for social contact. You never believed upon Him and never sought repentance and he may end with “I never knew you. Leave me.”
Christ Jesus is He who died, and still lives. We was the only one who left an empty grave. He was raised by The Heavenly Father from death and now he is at the right hand of God, where he intercedes for us (Rom. 8:34).
One day we will stand before God complete in Christ and forever saved from the presence of sin. We will be in God’s presence and will never again be tempted by sin. In the fullest possible sense, we shall be “saved by His life” forever because he lived among us, died and lives eternally now, as we who truly love Him shall also do.
God has taken us out of the category as “enemies of God” and has placed us in His family as sons and daughters. Because we are no longer enemies of God and are now members of His family, Paul writes through God-given inspiration that Jesus will rescue us from the final outpouring of His wrath on the Day of Judgment, which is coming very soon!
If He has saved us while we were enemies, He will certainly keep on saving us now that we are His children. Because we are now His friends God is not going to change His mind and cast us aside. He forever remains the same. Yes, there is a “wrath to come,” but no true believer will experience it (1 Thess. 1:9–105:8–10).
The most important questions are: Are YOU a true believer? If not, why not? What proof can you display that God is a myth or that Jesus was a liar, unfaithful, and a  lunatic-genius? I think you’ll have a long study in the effort to prove Christianity is mythology!  (Some don’t like for me to “proselytize.” Indeed, who spoke first about one God and who first prophesied about one savior? We can look to Abraham and Moses and study further who was this king to whom Abraham gave 10% of everything he had. Who was that king Melchizedek?) 
We rejoice in the “hope of glory of God” because our living Savior guarantees our glorification. There is much more in store for the believer. Moreover, the greatest demonstration of the power of God was displayed at the cross of Calvary when Satan and his hosts were defeated.
In our blessed union with The Christ Jesus, we stand with Him on the resurrection side of death. The work of Christ for us leads to His work in us to deliver us from the power of sin. We are in this sense saved by His resurrection life. We now live in union with the risen Redeemer who died for us and rose again. In effect, we also died in our baptism and rose again, and are eternally alive and a new person because of God’s plan and what Jesus did to fulfill it!
Life, peace and righteousness are ours in this new life in Christ. The very life which is in Christ in glory is also ours.
It is the living Christ, through His Spirit within us, who leads us, prompts our inner being, inspires us to holy purpose and molds our character to be conformed to His image.
The more we make ourselves available to Him the deeper becomes our awareness of that intimate relationship with Him. The life we live, we live by sincerity and faith in the risen Christ.
Because He lives, we shall be eternally saved (Heb. 7:23–25).
Inspirational Notes From:  http://www.abideinchrist.com/

Who was Melchizedek?

from: https://www.gotquestions.org/Melchizedek.html


Answer: 
Melchizedek, whose name means “king of righteousness,” was a king of Salem (Jerusalem) and priest of the Most High God (Genesis 14:18–20Psalm 110:4Hebrews 5:6–116:20—7:28). Melchizedek’s sudden appearance and disappearance in the book of Genesis is somewhat mysterious. Melchizedek and Abraham first met after Abraham’s defeat of Chedorlaomer and his three allies. Melchizedek presented bread and wine to Abraham and his weary men, demonstrating friendship. He bestowed a blessing on Abraham in the name of El Elyon (“God Most High”) and praised God for giving Abraham a victory in battle (Genesis 14:18–20).
Abraham presented Melchizedek with a tithe (a tenth) of all the items he had gathered. By this act Abraham indicated that he recognized Melchizedek as a priest who ranked higher spiritually than he.
In Psalm 110, a messianic psalm written by David (Matthew 22:43), Melchizedek is presented as a type of Christ. This theme is repeated in the book of Hebrews, where both Melchizedek and Christ are considered kings of righteousness and peace. By citing Melchizedek and his unique priesthood as a type, the writer shows that Christ’s new priesthood is superior to the old levitical order and the priesthood of Aaron (Hebrews 7:1–10).
Some propose that Melchizedek was actually a pre-incarnate appearance of Jesus Christ, or a Christophany. This is a possible theory, given that Abraham had received such a visit before. Consider Genesis 17 where Abraham saw and spoke with the Lord (El Shaddai) in the form of a man.
Hebrews 6:20 says, “[Jesus] has become a high priest forever, in the order of Melchizedek.” This term order would ordinarily indicate a succession of priests holding the office. None are ever mentioned, however, in the long interval from Melchizedek to Christ, an anomaly that can be solved by assuming that Melchizedek and Christ are really the same person. Thus the “order” is eternally vested in Him and Him alone.
Hebrews 7:3 says that Melchizedek was “without father or mother, without genealogy, without beginning of days or end of life, resembling the Son of God, he remains a priest forever.” The question is whether the author of Hebrews means this actually or figuratively.
If the description in Hebrews is literal, then it is indeed difficult to see how it could be properly applied to anyone but the Lord Jesus Christ. No mere earthly king “remains a priest forever,” and no mere human is “without father or mother.” If Genesis 14 describes a theophany, then God the Son came to give Abraham His blessing (Genesis 14:17–19), appearing as the King of Righteousness (Revelation 19:11,16), the King of Peace (Isaiah 9:6), and the Mediator between God and Man (1 Timothy 2:5).
If the description of Melchizedek is figurative, then the details of having no genealogy, no beginning or ending, and a ceaseless ministry are simply statements accentuating the mysterious nature of the person who met Abraham. In this case, the silence in the Genesis account concerning these details is purposeful and better serves to link Melchizedek with Christ.
Are Melchizedek and Jesus the same person? A case can be made either way. At the very least, Melchizedek is a type of Christ, prefiguring the Lord’s ministry. But it is also possible that Abraham, after his weary battle, met and gave honor to the Lord Jesus Himself.