HPV — The STD Wart Virus No One Wants To Think About

Genital HPV Infection and Related Lesions

I am drawing from several sources. Brace yourself because I’m going to speak to everyone but be frank with a younger audience, many of whom may not be Bible students.

I was surprised when I realized the Colgate oral health site didn’t say anything about Genital Wart virus which certainly can appear in the mouth and throat for people engaging in oral sex.

These days among promiscuous people even kissing can be dangerous! Some of these viruses can lead to cancer a few months or years after contracting them. We realize then, we have good reason to think about this issue carefully and talk to other friends, even call in a doctor or teacher of bacteriology and public health to give a few classes somewhere. There are many reference URL’s here but I suggest you read this article carefully first, and then click the other URL links if you want to learn more. “Forewarned is forearmed” = which means, the more knowledge you have the better you are able to protect yourself!

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/246670.php

More of everything you don’t want to know but should read about anyway:  https://www.medinstitute.org/faqs/how-many-stis-are-there-and-what-are-their-names/

Diagnosis

Your doctor might be able to diagnose HPV infection by looking at your warts.

If genital warts aren’t visible, you’ll need one or more of the following tests:

  • Vinegar (acetic acid) solution test.A vinegar solution applied to HPV-infected genital areas turns them white. This may help in identifying difficult-to-see flat lesions.
  • Pap test.Your doctor collects a sample of cells from your cervix or vagina to send for laboratory analysis. Pap tests can reveal abnormalities that can lead to cancer.
  • DNA test.This test, conducted on cells from your cervix, can recognize the DNA of the high-risk varieties of HPV that have been linked to genital cancers. It’s recommended for women 30 and older in addition to the Pap test.

Treatment

Warts often go away without treatment, particularly in children. However, there’s no cure for the virus, so they can reappear in the same place or other places.

Medications

Medications to eliminate warts are typically applied directly to the lesion and usually take many applications before they’re successful. Examples include:

  • Salicylic acid.Over-the-counter treatments that contain salicylic acid work by removing layers of a wart a little at a time. For use on common warts, salicylic acid can cause skin irritation and isn’t for use on your face.
  • Imiquimod (Aldara, Zyclara).This prescription cream might enhance your immune system’s ability to fight HPV. Common side effects include redness and swelling at the application site.
  • Podofilox (Condylox).Another topical prescription, podofilox works by destroying genital wart tissue. Podofilox may cause pain and itching where it’s applied.
  • Trichloroacetic acid.This chemical treatment burns off warts on the palms, soles and genitals. It might cause local irritation.

Surgical and other procedures

If medications don’t work, your doctor might suggest removing warts by one of these methods:

  • Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryotherapy)
  • Burning with an electrical current (electrocautery)
  • Surgical removal
  • Laser surgery

 HPV in Men

Much of the information about HPV virus (human papillomavirus) centers on women, since having the virus increases their risk of getting cervical cancer. But HPV virus in men can cause health problems, too. It’s important for men to understand how to reduce the risks of HPV infection.

HPV infection can increase a man’s risk of getting genital cancers, although these cancers are not common. HPV can also cause genital warts in men, just as in women.

More than half of men who are sexually active in the U.S. will have HPV at some time in their life. Often, a man will clear the virus on his own, with no health problems.

PREVENTION:  

There are actually about 100 of these different viral strains. You can’t develop an immunity to all of them. There are vaccines for some of them, but I don’t think you can trust that as 100% effective. Viruses change constantly. Vaccines do not! The best answer is to avoid being touched by such viruses. How? Use condoms and lube. Wash your skin and genitals after your sex play. Avoid oral sex. Avoid kissing strangers. Everyone is passing diseases around in their kisses too. Sorry to say so but that’s the truth! The best thing is to buy and use condoms and sex lube (personal lubricant). Save yourself a lot of grief! If you’re having sex play with various partners always use condoms and lube.

So…in real life Dr. Steve, how do we do this?

My suggestion is first, arrive for a hot date carrying condoms, lube and a little container of liquid soap. If you both agree you want to get connected, give your lover some massage while s/he is still dressed. You can even begin sitting on a couch and massage her hands or feet.

Get into some art about undressing your partner and yourself, slip a condom on. Apply lube to both of you. Have some towels and paper towels there to keep bodies and bed clothes dry and tidy.

If you must touch eyes, nose or mouth, do it with a tissue or paper towel or paper napkin.  Continue again doing more massage on bare skin. Warm oil or lotion rubbing them in your palms, then apply the oil or lotion, spread it thin so you have some drag between your hands and “her” skin and continue working those muscles. Use a healthy vegetable oil, not a baby oil or mineral oil. That stuff does not belong on or in your body! It’s made from crude oil and is poisonous!

If you’re a man and your lover is face down put lube on yourself and on her, very gently slowly enter and her and meantime, dry your hands with paper towels. If you have hand sanitizer or soap and a bowl of water on a table beside the bed, that’s even better. Wash your hands, dry them well, then add more lotion, and continue massaging.

Stop moving and just massage, break the excitement and the desire to go fast and end it too soon. Be more self disciplined about this art-form. Men who are so excited they tend to have a release too soon can make the session much longer by not moving, giving yourself time to breathe deeply and calm down, move a little and stop, wait, breathe, calm down more, try again, and finally feel yourself desensitize, and then finally you can reach a point where you’ll be able to please her a very long time before your release.

When you agree you both need rest time, go into the bathroom carrying your own little container of liquid soap. Remove and throw away the condom, and used paper towels. (Don’t flush them ; you might clog the pipes. There should be a trash container in the bathroom somewhere.) 

Wash thoroughly with soap and water. Dry with a clean towel or paper towels. NEVER SHARE a wet towel or soap, because if you do you pass viruses to the soap or towel and then onto yourself.

I realize no one else in any of the health websites has answered this question properly. It was not written for the Elder Ladies Christian Quilting Club. It’s for young people who have been there and done that so much — but they’re still confused and dissatisfied. I’m sorry if I have offended you, but a lot of readers needed to “hear” it and someone needed to say this. I’m the one with the courage to say it.

A much better solution is to settle with ONE partner and remain faithful. Better still, get married before God. I don’t care if you NEVER tell the government, but do it before God. Discover more about loving God and one another and do this “marriage” the right way!

       (Formal weddings in churches are relatively new. Until the late 1800’s couples often had a little private wedding at home with friends around them and a local visiting preacher would speak the vows and pronounce them married. These days this is called a “common law marriage” or “social union.”)

Learning some sort of massage, based in Swedish Massage, is really easy. I think many of us are born knowing some of it. We just don’t realize we have it in us! There’s a lot of demonstration available free to see at YouTube.  You can learn a lot free and by practicing with your lover. Teach yourself to massage and get connected and continue massaging and extend the experience much longer massaging and making love and even talking to one another.

The big idea I want to pass to you is, don’t use a partner’s body like it’s a piece of rented gym equipment or a sex toy. Doing that is just mutual masturbation. No one is emotionally satisfied, and there’s no loving expression so you end up feeling used, miserable and “empty.” No one can be happy about that. “They’re looking for love in all the wrong places with all the wrong faces.”

If you are miserable being alone, speak truthfully to potential partners about everything you think is your secret. These are his/her secret questions too.  Finally settle with ONE and make a promise you intend to keep to stay together.

Take time, learn to experience the beauty of this experience and finally do some serious discussion about making this your permanent relationship. I don’t mean “change partners every two years,” I mean that you must talk reasonably to one another through the difficult times and the good times. Use logic. Name calling only makes a problem far worse. Say what you FEEL about an issue and then say what you want instead. For example:  “I feel unwanted when you go out with the guys and leave me at home alone. I want to go out too, with you.” If he says he doesn’t want to do that, maybe he should find a different group of friends to socialized with on weekends.

Finally realize you’re not getting any younger. The society out there is getting more dangerous by the day. Settle together and through the good and bad times stay together. Even if you are one who thinks God is a myth, just for your own biological survival, settle with ONE and remain together.

(This website is full of good science material proving God is real but if you don’t want to look, that’s your decision and no one should try to force you to change your mind. It’s your life and you should decide.)

SLIDESHOW

Visual Guide to Warts

Anywhere you have skin, from face to feet, you can get warts. Find out what kinds there are, what causes them, who gets them, and what you can do about them.

WEBMD

Diverse Clinical Trials Lead to Better Cancer Drugs

Diverse clinical trials help will help researchers create treatments that benefit all Americans.

Risks of HPV Infection in Men

Some of the types of HPV associated with genital cancers can lead to cancer of the anus or penis in men. Both of these cancer types are rare, especially in men with a healthy immune system. The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates about 2,120 men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer of the penis in 2017, and about 2,950 men will be diagnosed with anal cancer.

The risk of anal cancer is about 17 times higher in sexually active gay and bisexual men than in men who have sex only with women. Men who have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) are also at higher risk of getting this cancer.

Most cancers that are found in the back of the throat, including at the base of the tongue and in the tonsils, are HPV related. In fact, these are the most common HPV-related cancers found in men. More than 13,000 new cases are diagnosed in men each year. 

Other types of HPV virus rarely cause cancer in men, but they do cause genital warts. At any given point in time, about 1% of sexually active men in the U.S. will have genital warts.

We’re not going into cancer treatment here. If you want to read further see this page:  https://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/hpv-genital-warts/hpv-virus-men#1 and continue to the next pages.

HPV and Cervical Cancer: What’s the Link?  

The complete article with more links is here:  https://www.webmd.com/sexual-conditions/hpv-genital-warts/cervical-cancer-hpv-what-women-girls-should-know#1-2 

IN THIS ARTICLE

Many things have been linked to cancer, from genetics to tobacco use. But we know for sure that most cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted disease called human papilloma virus, or HPV.

That also means we can prevent most cases of cervical cancer. How? By preventing HPV through vaccinations and practicing safe sex.

What Is HPV?

HPV is the most common type of sexually transmitted disease, or STD. It’s not one, but a group of more than 200 closely related viruses.

Sexually transmitted HPV comes in two different types:

  • Low-risk HPV types cause genital warts — bumps on the penis or vagina
  • High-risk HPV types cause cancers in both men and women

HPV has been linked to cancers of the:

SLIDESHOW

Visual Guide to Warts

Anywhere you have skin, from face to feet, you can get warts. Find out what kinds there are, what causes them, who gets them, and what you can do about them.

How Do You Get HPV?

You can catch HPV through oral, vaginal, and anal sex. The virus is so common that most men and women who are sexually active will have HPV at some point. You can pass HPV to your partner even if you don’t know you’re infected.

You can’t catch HPV from a toilet set or swimmingpool. It also doesn’t pass from person to person through casual contact, like shaking hands.

How Does HPV Cause Cervical Cancer?

Most of the time HPV infections go away on their own in 1 to 2 years. Yet some people stay infected for many years.

If you don’t treat an HPV infection, it can cause cells inside your cervix to turn into cancer. It can often take between 10 and 30 years from the time you’re infected until a tumor forms.

Can You Prevent HPV?

One way to avoid HPV and cervical cancer is to use condoms. Another way is to get vaccinated. Two HPV vaccines are currently available:

GardasilThis HPV vaccine is recommended for girls and boys age 11 or 12, but can be given as early as 9. It’s recommended for females up to age 26, and men up to age 21, and may be given to men up to age 26. Talk to your doctor about your specific case. It’s also given in 3 doses.

Gardasil-9. This vaccine is for boys and girls and routinely given at 11 or 12, but it can be given beginning at age 9 and through age 26.

The key for all three vaccines is to get them before having sex for the first time — and before being exposed to HPV. You need to get all three doses of the HPV vaccine for it to work.

Practicing safe sex is another way to avoid getting HPV. Use a latex condom every time you have sex. Condoms don’t protect against HPV 100% of the time, but they can help.

Does HPV Have Symptoms?

Often HPV causes no symptoms. Some types of HPV can cause genital warts. Warts are single bumps, or clusters of bumps that look sort of like cauliflower.

Genital warts can form around the:

  • Vagina, vulva, groin, anus, mouth, or throat in women
  • Penis, scrotum, thigh, groin, anus, mouth, or throat in men

HPV can also cause cervical cancer. Symptoms of cervical cancer include:

Cervical cancer often doesn’t cause symptoms until it has already spread. That’s why it’s important to get screened with a Pap test.

Why Get a Pap Test?

A Pap test is one way to screen for cervical cancer. It can find this cancer early, when it’s easiest to treat.

During a Pap test, the doctor takes a sample of cells from your cervix. That sample goes to a lab. It’s tested to see if any of the cells have started to turn into cancer. Your doctor can also test the cells for HPV.

Women should get screened:

  • With a Pap test once every 3 years from age 21 to 65, or
  • With a Pap test and an HPV test once every 5 years from age 30 to 65

Ask your doctor or gynecologist about your HPV and cervical cancer risks. Find out if you need to get vaccinated. And learn what other steps you can take to avoid cervical cancer.

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on March 29, 2017

From:  https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/hpv.htm

This is the US Government Center for Disease Control. I would call this and NIH the final ultimate authority.

Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection

CDC now recommends 11 to 12 year olds get two doses of HPV vaccine—rather than the previously recommended three doses—to protect against cancers caused by HPV. The second dose should be given 6-12 months after the first dose. For more information on the updated recommendations, see Use of a 2-Dose Schedule for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination — Updated Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices MMWR December 16, 2016

Approximately 100 types of human papillomavirus infection (HPV) have been identified, at least 40 of which can infect the genital area (758). Most HPV infections are self-limited and are asymptomatic or unrecognized. Most sexually active persons become infected with HPV at least once in their lifetime (533,759). Oncogenic, high-risk HPV infection (e.g., HPV types 16 and 18) causes most cervical, penile, vulvar, vaginal, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers and precancers (760), whereas nononcogenic, low-risk HPV infection (e.g., HPV types 6 and 11) causes genital warts and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Persistent oncogenic HPV infection is the strongest risk factor for development of HPV-associated precancers and cancers. A substantial burden of cancers and anogenital warts are attributable to HPV in the United States: in 2009, an estimated 34,788 new HPV-associated cancers (761,762) and approximately 355,000 new cases of anogenital warts were associated with HPV infection (763).

Prevention

The Best Way for low prices is to always use Condoms and Sex Lube. Carry these with you in your purse. Always, 100% of your sex play time, “wear something” and if you buy from CVS through my link you’ll get the best price and have it delivered to your door.

HPV Vaccines

There are several HPV vaccines licensed in the United States: a bivalent vaccine (Cervarix) that prevents infection with HPV types 16 and 18, a quadrivalent vaccine (Gardasil) that prevents infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, and a 9-valent vaccine that prevents infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58. The bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines offer protection against HPV types 16 and 18, which account for 66% of all cervical cancers, and the 9-valent vaccine protects against five additional types accounting for 15% of cervical cancers. The quadrivalent HPV vaccine also protects against types 6 and 11, which cause 90% of genital warts.

All HPV vaccines are administered as a 3-dose series of IM injections over a 6-month period, with the second and third doses given 1–2 and 6 months after the first dose, respectively. The same vaccine product should be used for the entire 3-dose series. For girls, either vaccine is recommended routinely at ages 11–12 years and can be administered beginning at 9 years of age (16); girls and women aged 13–26 years who have not started or completed the vaccine series should receive the vaccine. The quadrivalent or 9-valent HPV vaccine is recommended routinely for boys aged 11–12 years; boys can be vaccinated beginning at 9 years of age (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html). Boys and men aged 13–21 years who have not started or completed the vaccine series should receive the vaccine (16) (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html).

For previously unvaccinated, immunocompromised persons (including persons with HIV infection) and MSM, vaccination is recommended through age 26 years (16). In the United States, the vaccines are not licensed or recommended for use in men or women aged >26 years (16).

HPV vaccines are not recommended for use in pregnant women. HPV vaccines can be administered regardless of history of anogenital warts, abnormal Pap/HPV tests, or anogenital precancer. Women who have received HPV vaccine should continue routine cervical cancer screening if they are aged ≥21 years. HPV vaccine is available for eligible children and adolescents aged <19 years through the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program (information available by calling CDC INFO [800–232–4636]). For uninsured persons aged 19–26 years, patient assistance programs are available from the vaccine manufacturers. Prelicensure and postlicensure safety evaluations have found the vaccine to be well tolerated (764)

(https://www.cdc.gov/vaccinesafety/Vaccines/HPV/index.html).

Impact-monitoring studies in the United States have demonstrated reductions of genital warts, as well as the HPV types contained within the quadrivalent vaccine (765,766). The current recommendations for HPV vaccination are available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/index.html.

Settings that provide STD services should either administer the vaccine to eligible clients who have not started or completed the vaccine series or refer these persons to another facility equipped to provide the vaccine. Clinicians providing services to children, adolescents, and young adults should be knowledgeable about HPV and HPV vaccine (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/who/teens/for-hcp/hpv-resources.html).

HPV vaccination has not been associated with initiation of sexual activity or sexual risk behaviors or perceptions about sexually transmitted infections (128).

Abstaining from sexual activity is the most reliable method for preventing genital HPV infection. Persons can decrease their chances of infection by practicing consistent and correct condom use and limiting their number of sex partners. Although these interventions might not fully protect against HPV, they can decrease the chances of HPV acquisition and transmission.

Diagnostic Considerations

HPV tests are available to detect oncogenic types of HPV infection and are used in the context of cervical cancer screening and management or follow-up of abnormal cervical cytology or histology (see Cervical Cancer, Screening Recommendations). These tests should not be used for male partners of women with HPV or women aged <25 years, for diagnosis of genital warts, or as a general STD test.

The application of 3%–5% acetic acid, which might cause affected areas to turn white, has been used by some providers to detect genital mucosa infected with HPV. The routine use of this procedure to detect mucosal changes attributed to HPV infection is not recommended because the results do not influence clinical management.

Treatment

Treatment is directed to the macroscopic (e.g., genital warts) or pathologic precancerous lesions caused by HPV. Subclinical genital HPV infection typically clears spontaneously; therefore, specific antiviral therapy is not recommended to eradicate HPV infection. Precancerous lesions are detected through cervical cancer screening (see Cervical Cancer, Screening Recommendations); HPV-related precancer should be managed based on existing guidance.

Counseling

Key Messages for Persons with HPV Infection

General

  • Anogenital HPV infection is very common. It usually infects the anogenital area but can infect other areas including the mouth and throat. Most sexually active people get HPV at some time in their lives, although most never know it.
  • Partners who have been together tend to share HPV, and it is not possible to determine which partner transmitted the original infection. Having HPV does not mean that a person or his/her partner is having sex outside the relationship.
  • Most persons who acquire HPV clear the infection spontaneously and have no associated health problems. When the HPV infection does not clear, genital warts, precancers, and cancers of the cervix, anus, penis, vulva, vagina, head, and neck might develop.
  • The types of HPV that cause genital warts are different from the types that can cause cancer.
  • Many types of HPV are sexually transmitted through anogenital contact, mainly during vaginal and anal sex. HPV also might be transmitted during genital-to-genital contact without penetration and oral sex. In rare cases, a pregnant woman can transmit HPV to an infant during delivery.
  • Having HPV does not make it harder for a woman to get pregnant or carry a pregnancy to term. However, some of the precancers or cancers that HPV can cause, and the treatments needed to treat them, might lower a woman’s ability to get pregnant or have an uncomplicated delivery. Treatments are available for the conditions caused by HPV, but not for the virus itself.
  • No HPV test can determine which HPV infection will clear and which will progress. However, in certain circumstances, HPV tests can determine whether a woman is at increased risk for cervical cancer. These tests are not for detecting other HPV-related problems, nor are they useful in women aged<25 years or men of any age.

Prevention of HPV

  • Two HPV vaccines can prevent diseases and cancers caused by HPV. The Cervarix and Gardasil vaccines protect against most cases of cervical cancer; Gardasil also protects against most genital warts. HPV vaccines are recommended routinely for boys and girls aged 11–12 years; either vaccine is recommended for girls/women, whereas only one vaccine (Gardasil) is recommended for boys/men (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/hpv). These vaccines are safe and effective.
  • Condoms used consistently and correctly can lower the chances of acquiring and transmitting HPV and developing HPV-related diseases (e.g., genital warts and cervical cancer). However, because HPV can infect areas not covered by a condom, condoms might not fully protect against HPV.
  • Limiting number of sex partners can reduce the risk for HPV. However, even persons with only one lifetime sex partner can get HPV.

Abstaining from sexual activity is the most reliable method for preventing genital HPV infection.

12 x = = = = = = = = = What’s the number?   I want to point out that if you have “just 12” lovers per year and you have a connection with others who have only 1 per month or 12/year, at the end of the year you have in theory connected to every human on the planet. At least everyone on the campus, and a lot of other odd “friends” they met elsewhere during spring break. That number above I alluded to is 12 x itself nine times. The number is 61,917,364,224  and the previous number was more than 5 billion, so I’m not joking when I say trading partners like gym equipment can be disgusting and really dangerous.

Learning some sort of massage is really easy. I think many of us are born knowing some of it. We just don’t realize we have it in us! There are many demonstration videos at YouTube and you can learn a lot free and by practicing with your lover.

Teach yourself to massage and get connected and continue massaging and extend the experience much longer massaging and making love and even talking to one another. The big idea I want to pass to you is, don’t use a partner’s body like it’s a piece of rented gym equipment or a sex toy. Doing that is just mutual masturbation. Take time, learn to experience the beauty of this experience and finally do some serious discussion about making this your permanent relationship.

I don’t mean “change partners every two years,” I mean talk reasonably to one another through the difficult times and the good times and finally realize you’re not getting any younger. The society out there is getting more dangerous by the day. Settle together and through the good and bad times stay together. Even if you are one who thinks God is a myth, just for your own biological survival settle with ONE and remain together.

Among the sources here listed, which I call final authorities are the Center for Disease control and the National Institutes of Health. What you’ll see here is a bit more technically written but even if you’re not a student of health care, you can read and understand at least 80% of it, which is better than understanding nothing – which is the truth for most Americans, and most of the world’s population.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3495069/

Oh, the Joy of it All!  I know, I know! It’s awful. But…. It’s a lot better to be “forewarned and forearmed.” Should I send you for a walk on a lake with very thin ice? Wouldn’t you prefer that I tell you, “Walk around the lake but don’t go on the ice, you might break through and drown!” The best I can do is provide information to support the Judeo-Christian contention that you should marry a healthy partner and then remain faithful and avoid sex with strangers!

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